Publications


Exploration of large-scale museum artifacts through non-instrumented, location-based, multi-user interaction

Zabulis, X., Grammenos, D., Sarmis, T., Tzevanidis, K., Argyros, A.A. (2010) Exploration of large-scale museum artifacts through non-instrumented, location-based, multi-user interaction In Proceedings of the 11th VAST International Symposium on Virtual Reality, Archaeology and Cultural Heritage, VAST’2010, Palais du Louvre, Paris, France, 21-24 September 2010, 155-162.

Abstract

This paper presents a system that supports the exploration of digital representations of large-scale museum artifacts in through non-instrumented, location-based interaction. The system employs a state-of-the-art computer vision system, which localizes and tracks multiple visitors. The artifact is presented in a wall-sized projection screen and it is visually annotated with text and images according to the location as well as walkthrough trajectories of the tracked visitors. The system is evaluated in terms of computational performance, localization accuracy, tracking robustness and usability.

A platform for monitoring aspects of human presence in real-time

Zabulis, X., Sarmis, T., Tzevanidis, K., Koutlemanis, P., Grammenos, D. and Argyros, A. A. (2010) A platform for monitoring aspects of human presence in real-time International Symposium on Visual Computing, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 29 - December 1, 2010

Abstract

In this paper, the design and implementation of a hardware/ software platform for parallel and distributed multiview vision processing is presented. The platform is focused at supporting the monitoring of human presence in indoor environments. Its architecture is focused at increased throughput through process pipelining as well as at reducing communication costs and hardware requirements. Using this platform, we present efficient implementations of basic visual processes such as person tracking, textured visual hull computation and head pose estimation. Using the proposed platform multiview visual operations can be combined and third-party ones integrated, to ultimately facilitate the development of interactive applications that employ visual input. Computational performance is benchmarked comparatively to state of the art and the efficacy of the approach is qualitatively assessed in the context of already developed applications related to interactive environments.

The booTable Experience: Iterative Design and Prototyping of an Alternative Interactive Tabletop

Grammenos, D., Georgalis, Y., Kazepis, N., Drossis, G., Ftylitakis, N. (2010) The booTable Experience: Iterative Design and Prototyping of an Alternative Interactive Tabletop In Proceedings of the 8th ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS '10). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 272-281.

Abstract

This paper introduces booTable, an interactive coffee table prototype constructed by recycled paper aiming to build upon the paradigm of surface computing, but endeavoring to overcome a number of identified limitations of current design practice. In this respect, the paper first runs through the design requirements, decisions and rationale towards creating a first version of the prototype. Then, the outcomes of the prototyping process are described, along with the results of an informal assessment session and related critique. Following that, the revisions made towards the development of a second version of the prototype are laid out and the final result is presented.

PUPIL : pervasive UI development for the ambient classroom.

Korozi, M (2010) PUPIL : pervasive UI development for the ambient classroom. MSc Thesis. Computer Science Department, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.

Ambient Intelligence in the classroom: an augmented school desk

Antona, M., Margetis, G., Ntoa, S., Leonidis, A., Korozi, M., Paparoulis, G. & Stephanidis, C. (2010) Ambient Intelligence in the classroom: an augmented school desk In W. Karwowski & G. Salvendy (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2010 AHFE International Conference (3rd International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics), Miami, Florida, USA, 17-20 July. [CD-ROM]. USA Publishing (ISBN: 978-0-9796435-4-5).

Abstract

This paper discusses the opportunities and challenges of Ambient Intelligence (AmI) technologies in the context of classroom education, and presents the methodology and preliminary results of the development of an augmented school desk which integrates various AmI educational applications. The overall objective is to assess how AmI technologies can contribute to support common learning activities and enhance the learner’s experience in the classroom. Young learners were involved from the first phases of the design of the desk and its applications using scenario-based techniques.

FORTH-ICS internal RTD programme 'ambient intelligence and smart environments

Grammenos, D., Zabulis, X. C., Argyros, A. A., & Stephanidis, C. (2009) FORTH-ICS internal RTD programme 'ambient intelligence and smart environments 3rd European Conference on Ambient Intelligence, Salzburg, Austria.

Abstract

This paper introduces the horizontal, interdisciplinary, crossthematic RTD Programme in the field of Ambient Intelligence which has recently been initiated by the Institute of Computer Science of the Foundation for Research and Technology – Hellas, aiming to contribute towards the creation and provision of pioneering human-centric AmI technologies and smart environments.

Rapid prototyping of an ami-augmented office environment demonstrator

Grammenos, D., Georgalis, Y., Partarakis, N., Zabulis, X., Sarmis, T., Kartakis, S., et al. (2009) Rapid prototyping of an ami-augmented office environment demonstrator 13th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI International 2009, San Diego, CA., 5612 LNCS(PART 3) 397-406.

Abstract

This paper presents the process and tangible outcomes of a rapid prototyping activity towards the creation of a demonstrator, showcasing the potential use and effect of Ambient Intelligence technologies in a typical office environment. In this context, the hardware and software components used are described, as well as the interactive behavior of the demonstrator. Additionally, some conclusions stemming from the experience gained are presented, along with pointers for future research and development work.

Middleware for ambient intelligence environments: Reviewing requirements and communication technologies

Georgalis, Y., Grammenos, D., & Stephanidis, C. (2009) Middleware for ambient intelligence environments: Reviewing requirements and communication technologies 5th International Conference on Universal Access in Human-Computer Interaction, UAHCI 2009. Held as Part of HCI International 2009, San Diego, CA. , 5615 LNCS(PART 2) 168-177.

Abstract

Ambient Intelligence is an emerging research field that aims to make many of the everyday activities of people easier and more efficient. This new paradigm gives rise to opportunities for novel, more efficient interactions with computing systems. At a technical level, the vision of Ambient Intelligence is realized by the seamless confluence of diverse computing platforms. In this context, a software framework (middleware) is essential to enable heterogeneous computing systems to interoperate. In this paper we first consider the basic requirements of a middleware that can effectively support the construction of Ambient Intelligence environments. Subsequently, we present a brief survey of existing, general-purpose middleware systems and evaluate them in terms of their suitability for serving as the low-level communication platform of an Ambient Intelligence middleware. Finally, we argue that an Object-Oriented middleware such as the Common Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) is most suited for basing a middleware for Ambient Intelligence environments.

A multicamera vision system supporting the development of wide-area exertainment applications

Zabulis, X. C., Sarmis, T., Grammenos, D., & Argyros, A. A. (2009) A multicamera vision system supporting the development of wide-area exertainment applications In Proceedings of the IAPR Conference on Machine Vision and Applications (MVAΆ09), Hiyoshi Campus, Keio University, Japan. 269-272.

Abstract

In this paper, the application of computer vision techniques to the localization of multiple persons in a relatively wide gaming terrain is presented. Multiple views are employed both for terrain coverage, but most importantly, for treatment of occlusions. Through the appropriate selection of lightweight operations and acceleration strategies, an adequate frame rate is achieved despite the large volume of input data. The resulting system is employed in the development of multiplayer entertainment applications, which are demonstrated and evaluated.

Building a multi-touch display based on computer vision techniques

Michel, D., Argyros, A. A., Grammenos, D., Zabulis, X. C., & Sarmis, T. (2009) Building a multi-touch display based on computer vision techniques In Proceedings of the IAPR Conference on Machine Vision and Applications (MVAΆ09), Hiyoshi Campus, Keio University, Japan. 74-77.

Abstract

We present the development of a multi-touch display based on computer vision techniques. The developed system is built upon low cost, off-the-shelf hardware components and a careful selection of computer vision techniques. The resulting system is capable of detecting and tracking several objects that may move freely on the surface of a wide projection screen. It also provides additional information regarding the detected and tracked objects, such as their orientation, their full contour, etc. All of the above are achieved robustly, in real time and regardless of the visual appearance of what may be independently projected on the projection screen. We also present indicative results from the exploitation of the developed system in three application scenarios and discuss directions for further research.

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